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What Type of Nurse Do I Want to Be?

It takes only knowing that you want to be a nurse and then the opportunities are unlimited! So what type of nurse do you want to be? As future nurses, consider the following advices which may help guide you toward the field of nursing that most suits your needs.

Start by understanding what you really like to do. This requires the effort of undergoing the clinical rotations and investing the time appreciating each specialty. At the end of the clinical rotation, try to reflect on the following questions: 1) how did you enjoy the rotation in general? 2) Did you find yourself to be an asset to the population you served during your clinical rotation?

The answers to these questions lead us to the second advice I have for you, which is know your personality traits. As it is very well known, we are not born alike. Each one carries his/her own unique personality trait that shapes and determines the role you play in society. For example, my first position out of nursing school was in a pediatric oncology in St. Jude in Lebanon. Even though I was an asset to the patients I served (my patients and their families trusted my care and my knowledge), this negatively affected my mental health. I knew I could be more valuable serving a different population which led to my transition to the care of the adult population. Even there, it was not as straightforward as I thought it would be. I came to realize after 6 months of my practice in the adult medical surgical floor that medical surgical nursing did not bring the best out of me. I realized then that intensive care nursing is what fulfilled my needs. I needed to care for the critically ill individual. This means I needed to use my critical thinking abilities in order to pay attention to every single critical detail in this acutely ill individual. I knew then I am in the right field and that I was an asset after I acted upon a slight spike in temperature which saved my patient the hurdle of getting into septic shock, ultimately saving his life.

My final advice to you is to seize the opportunity when it exists and at the same time be patient and wait for the right opportunity to present itself. While you wait for the golden opportunity, make sure whatever you do in nursing, be an asset to the individual you serve.

If you would like to expand your nursing knowledge and experience by earning your RN-BSN degree call 844-386-7321 to speak with a Program Manager and learn more about our online degree program.

Written by: Widener Univeristy Faculty, Jihane Hajj